Honors Courses


This course is intended to meet the requirements of UNIV 1001 and provide Bumpers College Honors students with an overview of the Honors Program as well as provide insight into research and creative project development and expectations.

Exploring issues relevant to human deeds in plants, animals, and environment. Issues to be addressed include the sanctity of life issues, their role of mass media in the modern world and the responsibility of individuals as professionals. Recitation 3 hours per week for the second 5 weeks of the semester.
 

This course offers a synthesis level learning opportunity. Course will include creative process, ethics, proposal writing, literature review, experimental design, scientific theory and methods, data collection, statistics, budget, and summary. Students will draw on their background and presentations to create written proposals. Prerequisite: Sophomore, junior or senior standing. (Spring, Fall)

 

Available: (Irregular)

Variable credit, 6 credit hours required to graduate. Available: (Fall, Spring, Summer)
Select mentor and Honors Thesis committee.
Research/Creative endeavor proposal.
Conduct research or creative endeavor.
Write and defend Honors Thesis. Do not sign up for last Honors Thesis credit hour until the semester when you will defend and complete your Honors Thesis.
Enrollment is by permission only.
      
 
 

Introduction to agricultural economics, including a survey of the role and characteristics of agriculture businesses in our economic system. Basic economic concepts concerning price determination, profit maximization, and resource use are emphasized. Available: (Spring, Fall)

 

An introductory, issues-oriented course in the economics of the environment and how society makes decisions about environmental quality. The environmental issues important to the State of Arkansas and the United States will be emphasized. Available: (Spring)

 
 

An Introduction to the basic principles of leadership, with emphasis on practical strategies on becoming better leaders. Available: (Spring)

 

Course content focuses on evaluating the merit of published research articles and designing an experiment in the social sciences. Students will identify a problem in their own career field or personal interests to be addressed through an experiment. (Spring)

 
Course content focuses on the biological sciences associated with the modern systems of care and management of livestock. Foundation sciences include topics in genetics, growth, development, physiology, nutrition, animal health, and environmental behavior. Available: (Spring, Fall)
Fundamental aspects of neural/muscle/bone tissues and the cardiovascular system. The normal structure and functions of these systems will be emphasized. Lecture 2 hours per week. (Fall)
Topics not covered in other courses or a more intensive study of specific topics in animal sciences. Prerequisite: Honors standing. May be repeated for degree credit.
 
 

Laboratory, field trip, and discussion sessions covering the concepts and information allowing students to critically evaluate environmental issues. Topics will include: laboratory safety, recycling, composting, geographic information systems, soil testing, water quality, hazardous wastes, waste disposal, wetlands, wastewater treatment, and sustainable food systems. Available: (Spring, Fall)

 

Laboratory, field  trip, and discussion sessions covering the concepts and information allowing students to critically evaluate environmental issues. Topics will include: laboratory safety, recycling, composting, geographic information systems, soil testing, water quality, hazardous wastes, waste disposal, wetlands, wastewater treatment, and sustainable food systems. Available: (Spring, Summer)

Selection, establishment, and use of plants to promote soil stabilization, water quality, and wildlife habitat. Principles and practices of managing plants for soil remediation, nutrient and sediment trapping, and restoration of plant communities. Prerequisite: CSES 1203 or HORT 2003 or BIOL 1613 and honors standing. (Fall)
 
This introductory course is designed to provide students with an understanding of the basic concepts of growing grapes and winemaking, including history, grape growing, cultivars, chemistry, wine microorganisms, fermentation, winery operations, wine marketing, and the sensory and appreciation of wine. Coursework is expected to integrate lecture and guest presenters with supplement reading assignments. Prerequisite: Honors standing.
Lecture, demonstration, and hands-on exercises will be used to explain and demonstrate selected principles of chemistry by utilizing a modern culinary approach. Hands-on exercises will provide students with experience in applying the knowledge learned from the class to explicate fundamental principles in chemistry. Demonstrations and hands-on exercises will take place during scheduled lecture time. High school physics and chemistry will be useful in this course.
 
 

The origin of dress, evolution of fashion as an economic identifier, the sociological aspects of clothing in various cultures. Available: (Spring, Fall)

Fashion components, marketing theories and practices as they specifically relate to apparel, home goods, and other design driven products in the global market. Focus on principles and techniques on how fashion marketers develop and apply marketing strategies that meet consumer needs at a profit. International buying and promotional aspects of the apparel industry are emphasized. Lecture 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: AMPD major, AMPD 1013and honors standing. (Fall, Spring)
 

A study of the product development used in the industry for a career in fashion merchandising. Available: (Spring, Fall)

 

This course examines design, production, distribution, and retailing of fashion goods from couture fashion to mass markets. Available: (Spring, Summer)

An on-site study of specific regional and international fashion markets for apparel merchandising and product development. Course further examines the design, production, distribution and retailing of fashion goods from couture fashion to mass markets as outlined in AMPD 4901. Course includes study trip; length based upon destination. Additional fees required. Course will also be offered each May and August Intersession. Prerequisite:AMPD 4901 (with a C or better), 2.0 min. GPA, AMPD major with min. 30 hours, and instructor consent. Corequisite: AMPD 4901 (with a C or better, if corequisite, must have C or better at time of trip), 2.0 min. GPA, AMPD major with min. 30 hours, and instructor consent. May be repeated for up to 24 hours of degree credit.
An interdisciplinary perspective on internal and external crises faced by contemporary families, including substance abuse, natural disasters and other crisis events. Students will explore the family processes during such experiences and develop strategies for stress management, coping, and recovery. Lecture 3 hours per week. Prerequisite: Honors standing.
 A broad overview of the physical, psychological and social development of the individual from conception until death. Emphasis is on individual development in the family context. Available: (Spring, Fall)
Courtship, Marriage, and parenthood in the United States, with attention to cultural and psychological factors which affect relations among family members. Available: (Spring, Fall)
Meaning of sociology and sociological concepts with reference to rural society; interdependence of rural and urban population in ecological areas; institutions; social change and adjustment. Prerequisite: Honors standing. (Spring)
A multidisciplinary course that focuses on the context and prevention of childhood obesity. Directed readings and discussion will center on an ecological approach: identifying the problem(s) and behavioral and environmental factors and their interactions, as well as predisposing, enabling, and reinforcing factors, and action plan(s). The issue is addressed from a multidisciplinary perspective, including economics, marketing, child development, nutrition, and health behavior. 
Topics not covered in other courses, a focused study of specific topics in the students' areas of concentration. Prerequisite: Honors standing. May be repeated for up to 6 hours of degree credit.
The functions of food, body processes, optimum diets in relation to health and physical fitness. (Spring, Fall)
 
Course content focuses on the biological sciences associated with the modern systems of care and management of livestock. Foundation sciences include topics in genetics, growth, development, physiology, nutrition, animal health, and environmental behavior. Available: (Spring, Fall)